WORDS TO THAT EFFECT

I recommend giving this episode of the Words To That Effect podcast a listen. It's an interesting look at H.P. Lovecraft and weird fiction, featuring some very insightful input on the weird as a genre from the writer Timothy J. Jarvis (whose novel The Wanderer I am currently reading and enjoying very much).

I was humbled to find Hollow Shores named as an example of contemporary weird fiction worth reading, so thanks Tim!

Listen to the podcast here: http://wttepodcast.com/2018/02/12/weird-fiction-hp-lovecraft/

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CONTEMPORARY SMALL PRESS REVIEW

I had a nice write up in The Contemporary Small Press, reviewing the launch night of the Diisonance anthology in Bethnal Green. I read my story (from the forthcoming Hollow Shores) 'The Wrecking Days' at the night:

Gary Budden read from his new story collection The Wrecking Days [NOTE: it's called Hollow Shores] which explores themes of nature and narcotics, writing from the margins of society ‘where reality thinned a little.’ His piece suggested that the artificial and the natural are not opposing at all, instead they are transcendent. Budden writes about youthful and reckless days spent on the London marshes. In such places of in-between, on the fringes of London, Budden writes about notions of being and belonging: the idea that ‘memory is a marsh’ as the world diffuses in mist and nostalgia. The marshes act as a psychogeographical jettison between two places, between city and country, between artifice and nature. Such spaces, as Budden presents in his collection, allowed them to explore their minds, without ‘shutting parts of yourself down.’ It was ‘a way of seeing the world for what it really is,’ to find their own version of what it means to be free: to be and belong on their own terms. But Budden acknowledged, through his tales of the wrecking days, that being able to see the world as it is can also pull you apart.

Read the whole review here